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Page background images and galleries: Scenes from the Woodland Ways circular walk by a WW volunteer

 

Voulunteer Tree image on front page by Sarah White: Creative Commons image

November

Newsletter

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Woodland Ways mission:

 

Education for sustainable development through local action and global awareness.

 

Discover our educational policy and vision here

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News page last updated October 8th 2017...don't forget to renew your subscription...thank you

Woodland Ways Pond


The meadow at Woodland /ways Pond has been slowly shrinking in recent years, and much of the reason is to do with shade from overhanging trees.


All along the boundary with woodland, a shaded grass-free strip has been ever widening to the point that about 20% of the meadow was lost. This year there were no bee orchids or yellow rattle in the meadow, for the first time since our introduction of hay management allowed these species to thrive.


Woodland Ways has negotisted with St Edmundsbury borough Council, and in winter the boundary trees will be coppiced to allow more light into the meadow. It will look drasic, but the trees will slowly regrow and in another 10 - 15 years we might like to coppice them again. Whether the boundary row of trees is sufficient to allow enough light in to the meadow remains to be seen, but its easier to cut too few and them cut some more, rather than cut too many and put some back.


Wildlife news


The new relief road, from Sybil Andrews Academy to the A14 at Rougham, has had it controversies. What isn't controversial, though, its the wildlife benefits that can be achieved from a new road.

 

 Many hundreds of metres of native hedge have been planted alongside the road, and a new woodland has also been planted. There's even a tunnel or two under the road, so that badgers can cross without being run over by the lorries and cars using this new transport facility.


Thanks


All our trustees do a great job, as does everyone else which contributes in any way to the success of Woodland Ways.

 

 Although naming names can risk annoying others who also are deserving, we'd particularly like to thank Gary hook who stood down as a trustee at our AGM due to work commitments.

 

Gary was our first treasurer, and even before that he was instrumental in inviting Green Light Trust to Moreton hall to inspire us to be formed.

 

Without Gary, we wouldn't be here. and if work commitments change, we'd love you to come back to us, Gary.

Have you visited

Natterer's Wood

lately?

Update October 2017

 

We are now on Twitter, follow us...

@NatterersWood

 

News from our woods

 

Hedgelaying at Natterer's Wood


A local hedgelayer called Fred has agreed to lay the hedge around the bat meadow at Natterer's Wood. (See item below...)


From the beginning in 2001, when the wood was designed at a public design workshop, we aspired to this, and now Fred is making our dreams come true.


 

Natterer’s Wood


Our headline introduced that Fred, a local hedgelayer, has agreed to lay or hedge at the bat meadow, Natterer's Wood. This will provide a dense woody structure to the hedge, traditionally to keep livestock into the field, but now valued as providing excellent nesting habitat for birds.

 

The technique looks drastic, as shrub stems are cut almost all the way through, then the shrub is pushed down on top of its neighbours, but it has worked successfully for hundreds of years.

 

Hedgelaying was traditional in Suffolk
for many centuries, until about the Victorian period where the rise of arable meant that all hedges didn't need to be livestock proof all the time, and the need for firewood, meant that a new tradition of coppicing hedges arose.


Fred will be laying the hedge from October through until early spring, so do pop in to see what he's up to, wish him well, etc. And if your neighbours or passers by think its being destructive, do politely let them know how wonderful it is.
Fred is also using the time to train a new hedgelayer, so the skills can be passed on and expands this craft.


This summer's hay rake went well, but was interrupted by two buzzards flying over Priory School which drew our attention for a few happy moments.


Pond Covert


A year ago, or more, we diverted the path so that people didn't walk close to an old ash tree showing signs of a weak trunk, and a risk of falling. Our experience is that the vast majority of people using the path have respected the closure, and hazel bushes we planted on the line of the closed path are surviving shade and root competition from other trees.


Importantly, the old ash tree has avoided the chainsaw and remains part of our environment. The orchard was successful, with the most fruitful year we've had, and with a good showing of wildflowers in the meadow beneath the trees.

Page background images and galleries: Scenes from the Woodland Ways circular walk by a WW volunteer

 

Voulunteer Tree image on front page by Sarah White: Creative Commons image

Web site design, hosting and content by Thirdsectorweb | Part of SmithMartin LLP Graphic Design by Radha Clelland | Code development by Natasha Smith

This newsletter was generously sponsored by Whiting and Partners Chartered Accountants